E3 Clutch/brakes

GPD

Greg
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So I am one my second rebuild of my clutch (not by me cause I don’t have the skill yet) and after a few hundred miles of driving it going down hill again. The last time he rebuilt it I provided a new master cylinder, a new slave and a nice new hose from Bogata. When I leave the garage the gears and brakes are fine. 8 miles later when I arrive at work, the gears are harder to find and the brakes work but feel really solid/tight when I step on them... as if they won’t work if I push through the resistance, but they do. The whole process repeats the next day. Appreciate any thoughts I should share with my mechanic when it goes back in to the shop.
greg
 

bluecoupe30!

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Looks like the tipping point where you finally take this job on yourself. Not that difficult, really. And your own "hands on" experience really helps when you ask what went wrong. You and especially, we, do not know what steps were performed to replace the parts you supplied. Sometimes there are shortcuts that result in disappointing results. Perhaps others will have some suggestions, but I think if you get your car up on jack stands, take weak parts off, replace with new stuff, bleed and assess results, you will have a far better result and a much bigger smile! Good luck ;)
 
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Bearmw

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I would check your brake hoses as you may have them collapsing inside and holding pressure when they shouldn't. Also you may want to check the brake and clutch pedal travel and see if they are in spec. Another thing to check is if your booster working properly? Put your foot on the brake pedal and start the engine and you should feel the vacuum assist come on.

It could be something else but I would start with those.
 

bluecoupe30!

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Bear makes a good point. Old brake and clutch hoses do collapse inside and make for disappointing results when you think you have thrown new parts at a problem and it hasn't helped. Let us know how it goes .
 

Dick Steinkamp

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Like Mike (@bluecoupe30!), working on my cars is a big part of the entertainment. It's not for everyone, however. If it's not fun, it's tough to get into it, learn it, and to do it. I can sympathize with that. I do agree with his advice, however. Give it a go. See if it is something that ends up being easier and more fun than you might imagine. In short order you'll know more than any mechanic that doesn't specialize in these cars.

Brakes are the most important subsystem on the car. If the car doesn't go it's inconvenient. If it doesn't stop it's deadly. Overhauling the whole system is really the best alternative. Rebuild calipers and master, 6 new brake lines, new pads, replace rotors if out of spec, rebuild pressure limiting valve, check booster for proper function. No short cuts.

With the clutch, there may still be air in the line and/or the MC pushrod is not adjusted properly.

This manual will be a big help...

 

bavbob

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Do the brakes and clutch both use the same reservoir like they do on the E24's...mine is an automatic so that's why I ask.
 

halboyles

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I would check your brake hoses as you may have them collapsing inside
This is one of the easiest and fastest jobs you can do. And it is a perennial cause of poor braking behavior. The flexible lines are inexpensive (the same ones as on the 2002) even if you opt for the stainless steel version. I highly recommend you buy or borrow a pressure bleeding unit (https://www.amazon.com/Motive-Products-European-Bleeder-Pressure/dp/B0002KM5L0?ref_=ast_sto_dp&th=1). Instead of filling the pressure tank with brake fluid, just fill the original brake fluid reservoir and top it off as you bleed. Much neater.
 

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billpatterson

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Hi there,

Totally support the swollen hose theory presented above, the simple fix and the huge difference fresh hoses make. I'd splurge on a set of flexible stainless hoses; many sources. Also, strongly support the purchase and use of a pressure bleeder; it makes the job so so easy and quick and several of them can be used on many manufacturers (as theres only a few brake part manufacturers used by so many vehicle manufacturers).

Regards

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