Huge Issue (Frame Rust)

Haseeb

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Got a 72 Bavaria a couple weeks ago. This was my first time ever buying an older car so I didn't really know there was frame rust until a friend pointed it out today and it looks pretty bad. I really do like my Bav but I have no idea what to with it now. I don't exactly have a lot of money, I was really hoping theres an inexpensive way to repair it so I could keep it or I would just part it out so I could at least not lose anything (paid 3k for the car). What do I do friends? (attached are pictures)
 

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Haseeb

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Thank you so much Rob! I was really quite worried here that I'd have to part this thing out before I ever even got to enjoy it. I am a bit mechanically inept unfortunately , is there someone I should take this to on Jersey for welding in the patches like an auto body shop or welding shop you might know of?
 

bluecoupe30!

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You may have to find a torch "artist". It would probably be depressing to show this to an auto body or restoration shop. They will feel the need to be quite pessimistic. But as Teahead has suggested, we have all seen worse. Someone gifted with a torch can craft some patches and really put those weak areas right again. Just ask around, perhaps there is a local club or your friend who pointed this out, may know of a independent welder who has done such work before. Good luck. Mike
 

Haseeb

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You may have to find a torch "artist". It would probably be depressing to show this to an auto body or restoration shop. They will feel the need to be quite pessimistic. But as Teahead has suggested, we have all seen worse. Someone gifted with a torch can craft some patches and really put those weak areas right again. Just ask around, perhaps there is a local club or your friend who pointed this out, may know of a independent welder who has done such work before. Good luck. Mike
Thank you so much for the advice Mike! you guys really made my day. I feel a lot better and I'll start looking for someone now!
 

Haseeb

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seems indeed no difficult job to weld some patches in there....and have it corrected ! Those frames are easy targets... even more tick plate , so easy welding...
Thats quite a relief to hear honestly!:D I'll definitely try to get it corrected, Thank you Barry I truly appreciate it!
 

duct-tape

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that rust is really not that bad.
I'm replacing about 75% of my floor.

If you dont know anyone, you may try calling a couple independent shops that "do everything" and ask if they'd be interested in a couple "small floor patches" before you even bring it in to show them. the guys that wont shy away are the ones that don't care what car it is, or have a price bias for guys that they can take advantage of.
From what you showed in the pix, it's about $2-300 worth of work.
 

autokunst

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From what you showed in the pix, it's about $2-300 worth of work.
I agree that this looks like a pretty straight forward job. No reason to punt on this Bav just yet. My estimate is a bit more conservative, could be as much as $600 to $800. Good luck - I am sure there is someone in your area that will tackle this admirably.
 

Haseeb

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that rust is really not that bad.
I'm replacing about 75% of my floor.

If you dont know anyone, you may try calling a couple independent shops that "do everything" and ask if they'd be interested in a couple "small floor patches" before you even bring it in to show them. the guys that wont shy away are the ones that don't care what car it is, or have a price bias for guys that they can take advantage of.
From what you showed in the pix, it's about $2-300 worth of work.
Thank you for the sound advice and consolation Duct-tape :), I'll start messaging some shops by tomorrow and see who seems willing. Thank you so much and good luck with your floors as well!
 

Haseeb

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I agree that this looks like a pretty straight forward job. No reason to punt on this Bav just yet. My estimate is a bit more conservative, could be as much as $600 to $800. Good luck - I am sure there is someone in your area that will tackle this admirably.
I feel so relieved that I can keep this car with less worry :DI sure hope I can find someone soon, and that estimate is very appreciated! I think I should be able to afford something in that range. Thank you Autokunst!
 

bavbob

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Are you just not good at repairs or are you just inexperienced with repairs? My Bav was exactly the same, I went out and bought a welder, watched a ton of YouTube videos on welding then got an angle grinder and some steel and did it myself. No time like now to learn. Besides, you don't buy a car this old and expect to have someone else do the repairs. Most shops won't know where to start but with this forum, you will get the right answer to almost any question you have.
 

Haseeb

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Are you just not good at repairs or are you just inexperienced with repairs? My Bav was exactly the same, I went out and bought a welder, watched a ton of YouTube videos on welding then got an angle grinder and some steel and did it myself. No time like now to learn. Besides, you don't buy a car this old and expect to have someone else do the repairs. Most shops won't know where to start but with this forum, you will get the right answer to almost any question you have.
I'd say inexperienced, never touched a welder or even know most of the mechanics behind any car in all honesty, but I am learning (and willing to learn from anyone I hire) as I go along and hoping that it can be restored enough to last me a couple years. I was probably a bit naive when I went out and bought it, but I learned that now too. It would be an interesting idea to buy a welder myself and try to learn, and you raise a good point about asking the forums for advice, so I could try that, but won't the materials cost a lot and I would need to buy something to lift the car up/cut out the rusted parts? There's a chance I could do something very wrong and ruin the car as well... I do have fairly small garage, but this is indeed a viable option
 

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..Haseeb, maybe look at doing a "Welding for beginners " course at night school ...usually over a short period of time . It seems you will need a hoist so are there any DIY workshops in the area where you can hire by the hour ? Otherwise , you could try and get access to a hoist and get someone that does mobile welding to do the job...might be more cost-effective that way . Good luck.
 

autokunst

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welding old thin rusted plates is not that easy , sure not for a beginner.... better hire a prof !
It's worth noting that welding isn't rocket science, but it is something of an art to create good, solid, clean welds. Admittedly, today's MIG machines are pretty forgiving - "almost" point and shoot. But I see a higher percentage of non-penetrating, gobbed up, dirty welds than I do clean, solid welds by a pretty good margin. I would liken it to painting with spray equipment. Almost anyone can manage to get a decent coat of paint out of a reasonably good gun and air system these days. But that combined with proper preparation of the surface, cleaning (both on the surface and in the environment), and all of the other steps that lead up to a good paint job is not something one does 20 minutes after opening the package.

I think this type of welding is something that just about any of us can and should be able to do. But it takes a little bit of knowledge, practice, and conviction before getting reliable results you'd be proud of. ;) My opinion.
 

Belgiumbarry

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problem is also it's sometimes difficult to clean the weld edges.... in corners, places you can't reach with a grinder etc... in & outside... any rust traces can ruin the weld ....i must say , my welder does everything TIG , not MIG.
Advantage is i never have to grind his weld ! :)
In my eyes , welding is like guitar playing , you must have it in the fingers and years practice.... sure in thin material ,difficult places,positions...
 

autokunst

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I agree Barry. I try to TIG almost everything. The process is so clean, and the results are a finished product when done well. But I do use MIG when/where applicable, too. There are a few hard to reach areas and/or areas that are too difficult to shield as well. I don't expect Haseeb to start TIG welding right out of the gate. :)

I like the guitar playing analogy. I've been playing for about 38 years - a few more years than I've been welding...
 

Belgiumbarry

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haha, if there is one thing i would want to know how... is guitar playing ! i have always had/have a acoustic and electric guitar , but never the courage to learn it.... perhaps i also don't have it in the "fingers" :(
I can make noise :D
 
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