TomkinsonBMWParts website

Discussion in 'E9 General Discussion' started by Cateyes, Jun 30, 2015.

  1. m5bb

    m5bb Well-Known Member Site Donor

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    When you think about it we don't even have a way to look up parts that is owned or sponsored by BMW.
    Real OEM is in some European country and privately owned. Here's the info.
    Domain Name: REALOEM.COM
    Registrar: GODADDY.COM, LLC
    Sponsoring Registrar IANA ID: 146
    Whois Server: whois.godaddy.com
    Referral URL: http://www.godaddy.com
    Name Server: NS1.LINODE.COM
    Name Server: NS2.LINODE.COM
    Name Server: NS3.LINODE.COM
    Name Server: NS4.LINODE.COM
    Name Server: NS5.LINODE.COM
    Status: clientDeleteProhibited https://icann.org/epp#clientDeleteProhibited
    Status: clientRenewProhibited https://icann.org/epp#clientRenewProhibited
    Status: clientTransferProhibited https://icann.org/epp#clientTransferProhibited
    Status: clientUpdateProhibited https://icann.org/epp#clientUpdateProhibited
    Updated Date: 28-dec-2016
    Creation Date: 07-jul-2004
    Expiration Date: 07-jul-2020

    I used to use the Penske site to look up parts. It was better organized and easier to use than Realoem and the prices were up to date.
    They took it down because everyone was using it but not ordering parts from them.
    You can see Realoem has not been updated since 12/16.
     
  2. Aussiecsi

    Aussiecsi Active Member

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    I know there are a lot of BMW diehards here , but sorry, the support of the classics compared to say Mercedes et al is pathetic . If it wasn't for independents like Walloths, I daresay a lot of us would struggle to keep our E9's on the road . The benefits of BMW supporting their classics and the marketing advantages that flow to the contemporary marque is a "no brainer " but it seems the bean counters are running the show these days.
     
  3. Stevehose

    Stevehose Well-Known Member Site Donor $

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    and Porsche

     
  4. LenS

    LenS Member Site Donor

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    Just wanted to promote and thank Lisa Disaia, Parts Manager at BMW of Warwick (they used to provide the Penske Parts site). I ordered a new muffler for my coupe and she hand delivered it last week. They're located in Rhode Island, but she was in northern NJ for a BMW corporate meeting, and went out of her way to save me the shipping. I've been buying parts from Lisa for ten years now, and no one (tried them all) comes close to her level of coutesy and professionalism. Her pricing is extremely competitive, and she will assist in tracking down any part required, even going to her contacts at BMW Germany when necessary. She is also actively campaigning for BMW to take their vintage customers more seriously, and establish a true parts resource for owners of classic BMWs.
     
  5. Ohmess

    Ohmess I wanna DRIVE! Site Donor $

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    Several comments:

    I too continue the dialog with Lisa. She is on some sort of US dealer council that communicates parts issues with Germany. I know she has taken up the cause for us, and have faith she will continue to do so. She is not local, but my local parts guys are clueless (and my local dealer is a designated Classic dealer, for what that is worth).

    I sat next to a guy at the PVGP yesterday who is doing some marketing work with BMW classics on a consulting basis. He's an e30 guy, so I'm not sure he feels our pain, but I nonetheless took the opportunity to reiterate my view that BMW needs to train the parts guys and to actually monitor the quality of their parts.

    I've stated this here before, but my view is that a primary reason we get such inferior parts is that BMW doesn't actually conduct quality control on the parts. Instead, they push off the liability for defective parts onto the supplier, and effectively reject returns from customers by implementing a restocking policy that punishes dealers for taking back inferior parts. Combine these two policies, and BMW insulates itself completely from the economic impact of poor quality parts.

    And another thing; as a CPA, I have no sympathy for the argument that the bean counters are making parts sales unprofitable. Allow me to define the costs that are allocated to the parts operation, and I will make it wildly profitable.
     
  6. Bert Poliakoff

    Bert Poliakoff Member Site Donor

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    I believ all dealers sell above MSRP.. I have a good parts guy in one of the local dealerships that gives me 10% on true list. It equates to 30% off dealer list
     
  7. jefftepper

    jefftepper Member

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    When it comes to to the car business, it occurs to me that the manufacturers and the franchise dealership network are primarily in the business of selling and servicing new cars. I recall reading somewhere that there is some sort of legal requirement for supplying replacement parts up to 10 years post production. Beyond that, it seems to be a roll of the dice. Obviously, the dealership service departments need the consumables to service their new car customers and to a somewhat lesser degree the collision repair parts needed to replace damaged parts on cars that are perceived as "worth" fixing. Continuing to provide new parts for the small number of remaining 40+ year old cars is generally not a profitable part of their business model. At some point the cost of producing, inventorying, shipping, and selling these low volume parts reaches a tipping point and somewhere a bean counter says, "enough". By obsoleting parts, I would suggest that BMW is betting on the current mainstream brand loyalists being more likely to come back to buy a new car and start the cycle again. Ask yourselves, how many E9 owners here actually also own a new BMW? We may speak with a loud voice about how the E9's are halo cars that enhance the brand identity, and how the value of such loyalty should result in better support from corporate but the hard business reality appears to be far different.

    My point is that before patting ourselves on the back for being brand loyal enthusiasts, remember that generally, the vintage BMW E9 crowd does not appear to be a significant part of the current mainstream BMW customer base. Having bought my first BMW in 1972 when the term "Yuppie" had not yet been invented, we became enthusiastic ambassadors of the brand and did indeed influence a number of car purchases of people within our respective circle of friends. There were so few of us out there that when we saw an approaching BMW on the road, we would flash headlights as part of that unspoken camaraderie which was common back then. The modern BMW driver tends to flash his/her impatience as a sign to "Get the Hell Out of My Way". (In all fairness, Audi is fast taking over as the brand driven by rude/impatient people around here! LOL). Over time BMWs became symbols of success and the mainstream car buying public, eager to be a part of the latest conspicuous consumption trend, helped move the brand to the customer base BMW now enjoys.

    With that being said, the modern aftermarket jumps in where the particular parts are profitable and a demonstrated demand exists, and even then, there is a delicate balance between high quality and low price. Coming from the vintage Mustang world where there were about 1.6M Mustangs built by the end of the 1973 production, Ford got out of the vintage parts business by the early 1990 and shifted to the low risk, high profit "licensing" side of the industry. There are a number of aftermarket manufacturers now reproducing Mustang parts (some under Ford license) of varying qualities and prices with tooling costs being the primary barrier to successful production. Generally there is a viable demand and market share at the lower price ranges while the highest quality parts with commensurate price tags tend to be somewhat less often selected by the average frugal hobbyist. Yes, Ford still exploits the Mustang brand but the buyers of the new Mustangs are generally a very different demographic and most do not turn their own wrenches. Perhaps the most significant contributor to the decline in availability of high quality parts in the vintage Mustang world is the growing consumer base focused on price with little thought given to the value of the particular item.

    With a comparatively smaller pool of remaining cars, I suspect the E9 hobbyist will likely continue to see parts inventories dry up over time with a move to cottage industry type manufacturing by technically savvy hobbyists needing parts for their own cars and making a small run for friends, bridging the gap. With 3D printers, I am seeing what may be the beginning of this trend here now.

    Just my opinion.
     
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  8. Ohmess

    Ohmess I wanna DRIVE! Site Donor $

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    Hi Jeff -- If BMW believes that failing to support loyal owners will engender more purchases of their current offerings they are sadly mistaken. They no longer make anything remotely similar to the cars that drew us to the marque.

    As to your thesis that a cottage industry will spring up to meet our need for parts, recall that BMW Classic is dedicated to maintaining the rights to their designs. BMW has no intention of allowing unlicensed manufacturers to make and independently sell their parts.
     
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  9. m5bb

    m5bb Well-Known Member Site Donor

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    We're just the E9 group. Same problem with the E30 M3 guys. Same with E28 M5's and on and on.
    Easy to complain but it's just getting worse.
    I get the Hagerty magazine and there are ads in there for Porsche and their Experience center here in Atlanta at their US headquarters.

    "Over 70 percent of all Porsche vehicles ever built are still on the road today. We make sure it stays that way".

    You know in 5 minutes I can Google and find 5 suppliers and buy a rear tailight for my 72 911. They're even in the $300-400 range.

    Ads for Mercedes as well.

    You should hear what the resto shops have to say about the availability and quality of the BMW parts they get.

    My thought would be to come up with an way to present our thoughts to BMW from a representative group for all the models.
    Find a person to send this info too and then do it.
    The parts lady at the dealer may have some input she could share with us.
    I have some ideas about a couple people to send to, one US and one German.
    Probably fruitless but we can at least say we tried.

    I'd like to start a thread devoted to this subject exclusively.
    Thoughts???
     
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  10. Aussiecsi

    Aussiecsi Active Member

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    ....given I used the phrase "bean counter ", maybe that part of your response was directed at me?. I don't think anyone will disagree with your assertion that selling ( quality )classic parts could/would not be profitable .All I was saying was that those controlling the BMW purse strings( fair enough , the Board too ) are not necessarily going to have an epiphany that selling classic parts is/can be profitable ; given experiences to date , it seems BMW is only paying lip service in regard to a bona fide classic parts commitment . FWIW , I don't think that BMW Classic Parts necessarily needs to be profitable and could well be a loss leader that nevertheless enhances the BMW brand. ( think sports sponsorship or VW/Bugatti Veyron) For me, it means continuing with the best of a bad situation and hopefully the likes of Walloths hang around for the foreseeable future as I doubt there are any BMW changes afoot .Definitely a different marque next time around for me even after 30 year E9 ownership . My 2 cents.
     
  11. jabloomf1230

    jabloomf1230 Member

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    BMW's only interest in the E9 is to display a poster of it in the dealer showrooms. I agree with Ohmess' sentiments that it will be up to the community to maintain inventories of legacy parts. BMW can't be relied on for that.
     
  12. Ohmess

    Ohmess I wanna DRIVE! Site Donor $

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    I wasn't necessarily directing my comments to you. Rather, I often hear people familiar with the car business comment on percentage markups and required levels of profitability and whatnot -- the kind of stuff I frequently hear from MBAs who rely heavily on this type of knowledge to declare they can run a business -- and I look at these issues differently. Your response says it perfectly -- management makes decisions on how to allocate costs. These decisions determine the rules of the game within any business organization and all the go-getters in any business take these cost allocations as gospel (and indeed, they are often carved is stone), acting accordingly. If BMW valued us, they could move part of the costs to operate the BMW Classic group elsewhere, or consider it part of their marketing budget or whatever (there are lots of ways to do this), but they don't. Mercedes and Porsche have addressed this issue differently.
     
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