Gasket Remover?

TG-2002-320i-328ci

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Upon removing my intake C-Pipes, about 1/3 of the old gaskets came off with the pipes. Those weren't too bad to deal with as I could physically hold them and soak-n-scrape (plastic scraper) the old gaskets off. However, I'm now having to deal with the gaskets stuck to the block and they are practically welded on.

I've read some recommendations outside of this forum, but does anyone have direct experience with removing gaskets off the block? Keep in mind that the engine is still in the car.
 

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nosmonkey

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A fresh razor blade should make short work of it, apply minimal pressure and go at a shallow angle
 

Ohmess

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I use an exacto knife with a flat blade on it. My preference is too use a tool I know will do the job, even it I have to be careful with it to avoid damage. In this case, the steel in the blade will actually cut into the aluminum of the head if you are impatient. As nosmonkey says, a shallow angle is preferable.

One other note, your picture shows a small bit of corrision around one of the studs. This will expand the stud making the gasket hold tighter around that area. This is a good place to start because sometimes you can get the release Chris mentioned when you get under these tight areas.
 

Ohmess

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I've read other posts that recommends using a die to clean the threads? (Once the old gaskets are off, of course)
I have a set of thread cleaners that I use; not as aggressive as a die. However, I will often use a little oil and try to spin a nut on by hand first. If the nut moves freely, I don't bother.
 

OCCoupe

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TG-2002-320i-328ci

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Thank you. I got back to work on them today - pretty much finished the accumulator ports. None of the gaskets came off in one piece or one layer - it took hours of gently scraping with various blades in addition to using Permatex Low VOC Gasket Remover - which did very little, if anything.

I will start on the intake manifold gaskets, which also seem to be welded on, once I have the scraper you have recommended.
 

TG-2002-320i-328ci

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That carbide scraper made quite the difference - not at peeling off the layers of the gaskets, but getting the final bits that were gripping the aluminum. Thanks for that!

Also - I followed the recommendation of another forum and used WD-40 along with the scraper. The good thing about WD-40 (in addition to lubricating and protecting the aluminum) is that it has an illuminating effect of highlighting the remaining bits of gasket on the block and accumulator.

I don't think the Permatex contributed anything to this endeavor...
 

rsporsche

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i always start with the plastic blade scraper ... if that doesn't work i go with a more aggressive approach. you can put plastic blades in your traditional razor blade scraper
 

TG-2002-320i-328ci

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i always start with the plastic blade scraper ... if that doesn't work i go with a more aggressive approach. you can put plastic blades in your traditional razor blade scraper
I bought a whole kit of "plastic" razor blades and a holder/handle. Not effective at all. These gaskets were practically welded on. I've got about 4-5 hours invested into just getting rid of these gaskets...
 

rsporsche

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that's good to know ... but i like to start with a less destructive material ... but once that's proved ineffective, you have to step it up. i like the idea of a bigger (wider) scraper to avoid turning sideways and scratching the metal
 

wkohler

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I have the Matco version of the scraper occoupe referenced above. It’s great. The problem with razor blades is they deflect. They’re ok for trying to slip between the gasket and the surface but if you want to actually get anything done, you need something more substantial.

Also you want a thread chaser set versus cutting taps. You just want to clean out the threads not remove thread material.
 

deQuincey

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I'll try a combination of the flat Exacto and plastic razor blades.

What about a chemical agent to loosen up the gaskets?

9BD8D0F0-3C62-4BA0-A684-2BF11B85ED59.jpeg




And to install the new gasket I use this, a high tack adhesive in stick very useful to keep gaskets in place and to compensate small imperfections of seating surfaces
 

deQuincey

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Is this a single side or double-side application on the gasket?
Thanks

both sides, just put a dab of the product and spread it with your fingers covering all the gasket with a fine layer, it is slow curing, so plenty of time to work on it

particularly good to help in case of vertically placed gaskets like water pump, or oil filter (yes I change oil filter by removing the support from engine block)
 
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