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Clock Repair Sources

CSteve

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I need some suggestions for where to send my clock. It finally stopped running after getting slower and slower and slo... for a couple of years. Finally stopped. Dead. I don't think it is a broken internal part. Any ideas?

thanks, Steve
 

Bert Poliakoff

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There are people in Hemming's that do clock repair and and at the same time several of them have the ability to substitute a quartz movement into your existing clock
 
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CSteve

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There are people in Hemming's that do clock repair and and at the same time several of them have the ability to substitute a quartz movement into your existing clock
Thanks, Bert. I will check. The quartz movement sounds like a good idea.

Steve
 

HB Chris

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There are several places that do this, North Hollywood Speedometer and Palo Alto Speedometer are probably the two best known, call for a quote.
 

CSteve

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Check that it isn't just the simple internal fuse
Mark, would the failure of the internal fuse cause the clock to slow down gradually. A year ago it would stop. I would turn the hands a half dozen times, moving the time from 12 to six o'clock. Six spins. It would run for quite a while. Then gradually in spite of six or more spins it will stop sooner. Then it stopped for good no matter how many times I spun the hands. Your thoughts?
 

mark99

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Mark, would the failure of the internal fuse cause the clock to slow down gradually. A year ago it would stop. I would turn the hands a half dozen times, moving the time from 12 to six o'clock. Six spins. It would run for quite a while. Then gradually in spite of six or more spins it will stop sooner. Then it stopped for good no matter how many times I spun the hands. Your thoughts?
Not an expert, but I wouldn't think so
The fuse would be on or off
Again, I don't know much about these, but there is an electrical contact for each cycle that you could try cleaning
I am just suggesting a couple simple things to try before sending it to a pro
 

bimbill

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The "fuse" is actually a fuseable link made of low temp solder. As Mark said, if it fails the clock will not auto-wind. If it is running but slowing the link must be OK but the mechanism is probably gummed up. A friend who collects antique wall clocks recommended using BMW M specific 5-60 synthetic oil to lubricate my clock, after a thorough cleaning. Once I adjusted it on the bench it has worked great for five years, losing about five minutes a day. Good enough for me.
 

CSteve

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The "fuse" is actually a fuseable link made of low temp solder. As Mark said, if it fails the clock will not auto-wind. If it is running but slowing the link must be OK but the mechanism is probably gummed up. A friend who collects antique wall clocks recommended using BMW M specific 5-60 synthetic oil to lubricate my clock, after a thorough cleaning. Once I adjusted it on the bench it has worked great for five years, losing about five minutes a day. Good enough for me.
The "fuse" is actually a fuseable link made of low temp solder. As Mark said, if it fails the clock will not auto-wind. If it is running but slowing the link must be OK but the mechanism is probably gummed up. A friend who collects antique wall clocks recommended using BMW M specific 5-60 synthetic oil to lubricate my clock, after a thorough cleaning. Once I adjusted it on the bench it has worked great for five years, losing about five minutes a day. Good enough for me.
bimbill, if I had the talent of my buddy who removed the clock I would attempt what you suggest. I am all thumbs, well middle-digits probably describes me better, so I will probably send it to North Hollywood, especially after reading the reviews.
 

Tone

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Marcos and I would both recommend not using Seattle Speedo. They ended up being very unreliable. Took weeks for them to send out the clock, and even sent Marcos the wrong item initially.
 

Markos

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More detail later. I am still attempting to be made whole...
 
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tferrer

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What is a "multi gauge backdate" ? Sounds like turning back your odometer, though I suspect that isn't what you mean.
Haha! It's backing dating the LOOK of a set of Porsche 911 gauges. People will do 10k RSR tach backdates etc. I have a hotrod 911 that I took liberties with regarding the gauge font colors and the tach (10k now). I took them back to 356 colors...

20190424_193932.jpg
 
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