Rear Shock Rattle

Stevehose

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They are nice pictures & I'd be happy with 28 more years of driving gas Cars & Trucks especially because I'm just finishing up putting a 327 in my 54 Chevy pickup. Hope I find the thread with those what kinda look like flower pots in the photo above.
As far as that 10 year thing goes, a long time ago I was taught to reverse the meaning of whatever a politician says to get the truth, but then I did hear that the rockafeller family has gotten out of oil, that might mean something~
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Rod Cole

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Thank you Steve, I see now page numbers on the left that I missed. I guess I'm accustomed to looking on the right from the Mini forum and the Chevy forum I'm using for the engine swap. I'll be turning up a couple of these in the next few days. Right now I need to work on the Mini, got a bunch of parts from RockAuto for it and they included this fridge magnet, anyone know who Scott is?
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Rod Cole

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I now have one of the repair parts made up and will be contacting a Lodge Brother/neighbor who is certified for submarine welding. Thing is, he's retired and I don't know if he's flexible enough to get in the trunk!!
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halboyles

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SOmeone should repro some metal "caps" to weld on there not only for surgery repair, but for prevention.
Great idea. I am working with @Stevehose's drawings to create a model that can be CNC'ed. As soon as I can get a few quotes from some shops, I'll let the forum know. Perhaps we can do a preorder once we have a price for a large order.
 

Stevehose

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I now have one of the repair parts made up and will be contacting a Lodge Brother/neighbor who is certified for submarine welding. Thing is, he's retired and I don't know if he's flexible enough to get in the trunk!!

If you have speaker holes in the rear parcel shelf that may provide some accessibility to the other side. If he's a submarine welder he ought to be used to claustrophobic enviroments!
 

Rod Cole

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Well, my sub. welding friend doesn't do cars, being retired and only doing favors he feels cars can cause trouble (unforeseen issues). He did come by and look it over, and after telling me a story, suggested JB Weld. My issue with that idea is if it doesn't hold, the clean-up to get it ready to weld would be nasty! Also I have no speaker holes or I might try it myself, I might anyhow!
 

Stevehose

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I am a huge fan of JB Weld but I would not consider it for that repair, nor any other adhesive. IMHO welding is the way to go.
 

eriknetherlands

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2k epoxy body blue is a strong glue, perhaps even the strongest glue around, but still it is a factor 50 to 100 " softer" in tensile strength compared to a weld per
square area .

A single, well made factory spot weld, 4 mm diameter, will hold 250 kg (500pounds) easily. The jack pin was welded with 6 spots in my car, that is surely overdone. I bet it is sufficient to glue that one as it has about 4x4 cm or 1,5 by 1,5 square inch off glue surface.
In most cases you can increase the square area that you glue easily compared to the weld size, as in the example above. In the case of a shock tower however I struggle to see how you can easily increase the glue size by a factor 50 compared to the welded area.
Combine that with the fact that the initial design wasn't even strong even, it means I would look for >50 times the size of the welds as minimal area for glueing.
Perhaps a full sleeve could do it.
However the top cap is loaded from the bottom, and therefore it flexes up and down a bit (the examples I have seen of failed shock towers are all typical of metal fatique).

I'm quite positive that only steel can cope with that repeated flexload, not something that is in essence still fancy 'plastic'. Although even in steel, it should have been a bit thicker to begin with.....

Imagine how it looks like if a glued cap would shear off...if the glue goes, it blows to pieces in a fraction of time. It will be more sudden compared the a more zipper like tearing of metal It'll pierce your parcel shelf. I've seen pics of that happening even with failures of the original design.
 
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