Current/Future E9 values?

dang

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Is it just me or are classic car prices not on the rise anymore? Some would say, people with money are holding it a little tighter these days. Not sure it's a bubble, but it doesn't feel the same to me...

Dan
 

teahead

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Compared to what?

Compared to say 5 years ago, big rise. Musclecars, hot rods, exotics, euro cars.

Compared to say...last year? Hard to say. May be the same.
 

dang

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Compared to what?

Compared to say 5 years ago, big rise. Musclecars, hot rods, exotics, euro cars.

Compared to say...last year? Hard to say. May be the same.
Currently. I guess the "urgency" of the buy feels different.
 

Peter Coomaraswamy

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More of a "vibe" than a "feeling"; I think the electric cars are throwing some doubt into the market, also the future buyers (today's kids) are pretty clueless-if not hopeless, and so cars like ours (mid-market collectables) are seeing lots of fluctuating prices. Super rare cars will always climb in value because in the future money will still be money, but I have a vibe that cars from the late 60's through the 80's are going to have to be really special to continue to climb in value ($). Why would someone spend 60K on a 71 Cuda when they can buy Hellcat for 45K, and there's no comparison in performance- aesthetically (to me at least) they're quite close. Anyhow I felt comfortable chiming in on this since there is no wrong answer :cool:
 

Stevehose

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I am not even sure about this, something tells me the Gen Z and younger dotcom gazillionaires won't be interested as much in a 250GTO et al once all of our generation and older are too old to care or are dead and gone.

Super rare cars will always climb in value because in the future money will still be money
 

Belgiumbarry

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i would assume a status quo in the sub 50k ( the mass )and above 500k ( the happy few) … but i see many new ad's " for sale" in the 100...300k range. There is probably the danger loosing a lot of $$$$ .... with a hesitating market. Many cars in that range are over estimated with the good years and really not worth that kind of money. Just to show of at meetings , you "can" afford it... or ever believed it was a good investment.... i am sure glad i don't have a 200k oldtimer....
 

CSteve

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i would assume a status quo in the sub 50k ( the mass )and above 500k ( the happy few) … but i see many new ad's " for sale" in the 100...300k range. There is probably the danger loosing a lot of $$$$ .... with a hesitating market. Many cars in that range are over estimated with the good years and really not worth that kind of money. Just to show of at meetings , you "can" afford it... or ever believed it was a good investment.... i am sure glad i don't have a 200k oldtimer....
Perhaps cars from the 60s and 70s and ??? are becoming like antiques. A friends's mother died recently. House filled with once expen$ive, rare antiques. Dealers said expect quarters on the dollar. See the Real Estate Section of Sunday's NYTimes. Expensive loft in trendy neighborhood filled with antiques was not moving. The Agent photoshopped the furniture out, added a couple of pieces, loft sold in weeks. Same story with another apartment.

One couple interviewed said they bought expensive antiques as a retirement fund. Now a $10,000. piece is worth $1,200.

Now, few if any of us who love our coupes bought them as an investment. And a coupe we may have paid top dollar for 20 years ago may bring three times what we paid. But that appreciation is not going to fund retirement for long. Mine is going to my daughter and then on to my grandson. He says wistfully.
 

teahead

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Cars of the late 70s, 80s, and early 90s (especially Japanese sports cars) are all going up.

Trucks as well.

Just look at these crazy prices!



 

sandhu

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The enjoyment driving the E9 and the smile it gives us,the attention it gets , every day it’s out on the road , in dry weather is priceless and the smile it puts on our faces when driving , is also priceless !!!

Yes the value of the E9 has doubled in the last 3,4 years , but that is just a Brucie Bonus ... the E9 was not purchased for investment purposes aka a flip or to make a huge profit/money on it , ( like certain people on this forum do, acting like enthusiasts , (but are business guys) behind their greed for profit only)

Yes the prices have flat lined or gone south in the classic car market this year , I think as soon as Brexit is sorted out here in England , the classic car market and prices will go North !!!

I know of a few People looking to buy E9 cars , after Brexit is done and a couple of people who have purchased E9 cars for less than their asking prices from dealers !!!!
 

dang

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Cars of the late 70s, 80s, and early 90s (especially Japanese sports cars) are all going up.

Trucks as well.

Just look at these crazy prices!



Unicorns. There will always be special cars that get special prices. All I'm referring to is that the "buzz" of prices going up seems to be diminishing. But that's just my take, wondering what others felt. Seems like most of you think the classics/exotics market is still going strong.
 

jmackro

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Is it just me or are classic car prices not on the rise anymore? Some would say, people with money are holding it a little tighter these days. Not sure it's a bubble, but it doesn't feel the same to me...
You might want to read Keith Martin's column in the latest issue (November) of "Sports Car Market". While he is writing specifically about this year's Monterey auctions, where total sales were down $115 million from 2018, I think his comments apply to the market in general
 

autokunst

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Is it just me or are classic car prices not on the rise anymore?
I am no expert, and don't track with a spreadsheet (or any method, really). But I, too, have felt that the things (sales) I pay attention to have seemed to level off and even dip a bit.
 
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rsporsche

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i think the market growth potential is more based on the cars that were posters on the walls of the gen x ers, etc. those are the cars they will have attachments to. when i was young - the e9 was new ... i fell in love and now own one. when i was under 10 - i remember xke series 1, austin healey 3000, the 60's muscle cars ... late 50's thru mid 60's vettes. other cool design cars i remember when i was a late teenager from the 70's and then the early 80's - bmw m1, lancia montecarlo (beta scorpion), alfa romeo gtv, fiat dino, ferrari 246 dino, mercedes 280sl ... but those are from my youth. in the mid 90's, think toyota twin turbo supra, honda nsx, italian exotics and many others. the cars that my age prizes might not have any interest for many - unless their parents or relatives were into them.

i think the end of an era will be valuable for a long time - like the 993 porsche. one wonders if the last of the front engine corvettes will have value ... but its considered an old man's car ... that's the reason that chevy created the mid-engine concept to attract younger buyers.

to me, beauty is beauty and the e9 is there. the CSL is showing the market is still increasing. a great e9 can sell for a tremendous amount - ask occoupe. but i think we have seen some above average examples sell for too much. will they get back up to above 100k. might take a few years, but i think so.
 

aearch

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always wondered what mikes car sold for?
ours is surely one of the best top three bmw's ever built
as to detail were number one!
where else do you see so many pieces for window trim
 

adawil2002

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I am a Brass Era & Prewar Classic aficionado in addition to BMWs. I grew up in the collector car hobby and as many of you know I'm quite active with veteran, vintage & classic cars. This is how I see it...

The collector car market is in a plateau right now. Some time in the late 1950s, a 1913 Mercer sold for $45,000, it was the highest price ever paid for a collector car at the time. People thought the guy was foolish to spend so much. Fast forward 50 years, it's a $1,000,000+ car. The question is, how much more head room is there?

There is inherent risk in collectible cars, as we all know. "Past performance is not indicative of future results." is a common disclaimer for securities & commodities. the "Collector Car" market is not very different than the stock market. I do not think we are in a "market correction" because of auction sales in Monterey. In my opinion there really weren't many standout cars for sale.
 

TG-2002-320i-328ci

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I'm a Gen Xer who lusted after an E9 when all I could afford was a 1972 2002 ($2000 in 1988 money). It took me 25 years to finally get what I wanted and I probably overpaid, but it was something I coveted and value in a non-monetary way. I'll probably be buried in it.

Having said that, my grandfather was an ex-GM engineer and his hobby was restoring 40s/50s Packards and 40s/50s/60s Cadillacs. They were cool for me, as a kid, to ride around in, but I had no desire to inherit one of them other than the monetary value. Why? For me, there is no nostalgia in a car that was not made in my lifetime. I did't lust after those antiques. My 3.0CSi rolled off the assembly line about 6 months after I did.

By that logic, I don't expect the Millennials or Zoomers to lust after my car as much, if any, as I did. Many don't even seem to want to own cars (just Uber/rent/etc).

One American company that will need to adapt quickly to the retirement of the Boomers is Harley Davidson. From my Gen X perspective, those Harleys are a boomer thing.

Time marches on...
 

Michael Kaye

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No idea about valuations going up or down…but I do know I paid more than average for my car but it was a car that met some stringent requirements on my part; unrestored, rust free, low mileage, detailed history etc. So in the end I had little choice but to get the car I wanted (and I love it).

Ultimately though valuations don't matter to me; I will have this car until I'm a very old man…and who knows what that future will be like. Will we even be allowed to drive our petrol cars then? In the meantime I will enjoy my obsession with much fun, passion.
 
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