Current/Future E9 values?

Strato102

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Younger adults are just as interested if not more so in cars than ever. There is Forza, Gran Tourismo and everything that the internet offers which is far, far, far more than old people who tinker with MGAs who are intimidated by the Google can ever imagine. They don't see this and blame the lack of interest in Triumph TR3s on kids who always seem to be on that interweb thing. They are on the Google talking to other no good youngsters (probably from another country) about advice on re mapping the ecu on their 1000HP swapped motor or similar. These bored kids probably know more about Group B rally or 90s DTM or other great eras of motorsport than any of us (I am old, too). They weren't born in time for the Turbo era of Formula 1 and they weren't born in time for MG TDs being raced on local roads. They have made their choice. I don't worry about our hobby fading away due to lack of interest by youngsters as you might have gathered!
 

Belgiumbarry

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youngsters want a "oldtimer" that drives well... they are used to their modern 300-400HP daily.... perhaps our E9's just fill the dream .... just ,just... that's why i assume pre war cars will vanish on the $$$$ market , ... great to look at but they don't drive for a meter...… Flinstone cars…. sad however.


Same here with 911 Porsches….. the first one who drove "well" was the '89 964 ... totally different car as the older ones with torsion suspension..... no comparison .
 

bluecoupe30!

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Same here. Don't spend any time wondering if my Coupe I bought in 1988 is now worth 7 times what I paid for it, or whatever. Fun to watch auctions, I mean especially the last 25 minutes of a BAT auction, thrilling! But I am in a particular subset of owners of what is now a very collectible car, but the only place my E9 is going is to my sons, who have to choose what to do with it when I am gone and it will probably be liquidated to go towards purchasing some real estate in this crazy Vancouver market. I just hope at that time, there is still enough value in this old '70s BMW to help them. I am OK with that. For now though, I just drive it. :cool:
 

Strato102

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Had the pleasure of owning my share of longhood (stupid, exclusionary term) air cooled Porsches. From 2.0 SWBs to 2.4Ss. Well, here, let's put a face on these owners: old guys with PCA hats who know more than you. The life raft for sinking longhood (we are a restoration shop and we only work on pre 74 longhood...wtf?) values are outlaws. My 72 CSI had the same 0-62kmh time as my 73 mfi 911S. For only 1/10 the price paid. I cried when my vaunted 73S was loaded on the hauler. I did. After I counted my money I slammed my finger in my car door as I sped away. Here is a secret: buy a midyear 2.7 narrow body. Better car. Want a beautiful car with a substantive, meaner side that, in turn, checks more boxes? The e9. In my lifetime, nobody is going to get bored looking at this car in front of a chateau all stock or in wide body form pulling hard from La Source on it's way to Eau Rouge. Nobody.
 
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Markos

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By that logic, I don't expect the Millennials or Zoomers to lust after my car as much, if any, as I did. Many don't even seem to want to own cars (just Uber/rent/etc).

Time marches on...
I think that there are plenty of millennials that would love to own an e9. Is Instagram filled with
E9’s because Gen X’ers and Boomers are posting car show pics of bagged e9’s?

It is easy to argue that youngsters aren’t in to e9’s and air cooled Porsche’s when the entry point of a cosmetically/structurally flawed “driver” is 1/4 of their unpaid student loan debt.

I see two different observations being discussed...

One is that values are going down. I don’t think that sales figures support that quite yet, but there are plenty of leading indicators. I see market confidence declining as Monterey suggests.

The second observation is that “youngsters”
don’t like cars. I think that they just don’t like your cars, modded to your spec, pulling your HP numbers, using your fuel source. They also didn’t have auto shop in high school. They don’t have diagnostic equipment to fix their hand-me-down cars. They can’t fool the emissions station. They don’t have a garage, and their parents don’t know how to work on the cars that they actually like.
 

aearch

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THE MARKET WILL ALWAYS rise and fall
i think markos point of youngsters is right on
they didnt grow up with a real car you can mold as you wish
anything after 75 is untouchable in the way of mechanics
our cars will continually rise in price as they are becoming more and more rare.
 
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Wladek

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It's not a secret, that currently there is a worldwide mass tend for owning at least second or third car in garage (usually something unique). I think that worldwide mass tend started about 5-7 years back (in USA much, much earlier). That's why prices in last couple years where soaring just north.
Now, maybe some people have already become a bit saturated, hence the price correction may now be taking place?

Some cars are unique for us & another cars are unique for others.

But really unique cars in my opinion have to be:
1. Rare (at least under 20-30k production as whole model line, not just rare bodykit, engine, suspension or lightweight),
2. Desirable for most of drivers (good looking, good driving)
3. Have rich history (where milestones of it's times).

I think E9 is one of them, so we rather should sleep well.
 
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jmackro

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Wladek

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whats that have to do with our cars?
That probably shows direction of human thinking evolution, that new generation will concentrate more on high-tech, than old school. Most of young people up to 25-30 years old, want just to use things, not collect them, old things for them is just worthless garbage.
I remind myself Classic Car Chasing episode, where Sotheby's was selling Steve Jobs Z8. At the beginning Sotheby's valuation assumed, that the price would be raised by the young generation of people for whom Jobs was supposed to be a model, but final price (just 80-100k over market average 220-250k) showed that this generation don't give a sh.t.
It wasn't the same as with Janis Joplin Porsche, that was sold 10x over market average, where probably old school guys took part.
 

pat cooks

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I still have the 1960 MGA 1600 I bought in 1973 for £100.00, home restored it and drove it from London to Athens for our honeymoon in 1975, good investment, yes, good fun car, yes yes yes, would I sell it for say £30,000 no, maybe when I can no longer drive,
 

CSteve

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I still have the 1960 MGA 1600 I bought in 1973 for £100.00, home restored it and drove it from London to Athens for our honeymoon in 1975, good investment, yes, good fun car, yes yes yes, would I sell it for say £30,000 no, maybe when I can no longer drive,
Let's add to the mix the disappearing/dyingoff/retiring mechanic who KNOWS our cars and the cars like them. The intuitive wizard(What my wife named our former, now sadly dead mechanic) who can jump in, drive it hard, come back and say it's this and this and that. And almost always be right. How many stories have we read right here about a guy bringing his coupe to the local BMW dealer and wishing he hadn't. Twenty five years ago I won a free oil change for my coupe at our Local. I, who knows next to little, had to go back and "Help."

But I do remember around that time pulling up in front of the showroom at our Local for a BMWCCA meeting and emptying the showroom. What fun.
 

craterface

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A friend has an '86 911 Turbo. Says it was once worth about $110k, now around $80k, all in about two or three years.
This is correct. Porsches mostly down 20-30 percent. That Turbo was 45k in 2010, shot up, and now correcting. I think E9s have increased and are now flat, not declining like the Porsches. Ferraris down across the board. A Daytona was once 700-900k, now 450-750k, for example.

Fifties cars are DEAD. Sixties cars (especially American and British) soon to follow. Prewar cars that are spectacular like a Duesy are holding, as are prewar cars with competition history, all other prewar down. Cars that qualify for specific events like London to Brighton, Mille Miglia, etc are not doing too badly. Because you can DO something with them.

The e9 is an everyday useable classic that drives really well, even if they are not eligible for the prestige events. But plenty of our folks have done the Targa California etc. and had a great time.
 
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