Nice 1974 3.0cs Project on eBay

Markos

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For those of you have been a member of this forum for a while, the owner of the car previous to the current owner, was a contributing member of this forum. I believe his handle was 74 3.0CSA. At one point he did an instructional write up on dash removal. I have the hand written first draft as well as printed final copy in the notes.

74 3.0CSA said:
By John Beaumont (74 3.0CSA)

The windshield is out. I got the glass company to make a house call. I did not want to try it with the windshield in. The front gasket was worth saving. Technician used a very special "L"-shaped ice pick (blunt) to loosen the gasket without damage to the headliner or vinyl. They lap over the edge of the lip and there are special "gripper" clamps on top, bottom and sides. All are potential problems for the inexperienced. Let an expert do it. If the windshield has ever been rock damaged and repaired, you risk breakage at the weak point. Mine did have a repaired spot, but did not break. The console (lft., rt.,top) is also out, but the heating/cooling are still in. The seats are out, as are both glove boxes (lft & rt). I left the steering wheel in.

Before you scoot under the steering wheel, take the following items and place them within reach for when you are flat on your back looking up under the dash:

1. light source
2. 5/16" wrench or socket (or both)
3. long shaft medium to large blade
4. steno pad and pen.
5. a #1 phillips screwdriver

Now get under the dash and locate the headlight switch. Behind and to the (right or left) remove the roundhead phillips screw (secures left leg of cowl covering instrument cluster). Some wires may be in the way.
Look up and to the right (where wood curves) and find "V"-shaped pop clip. Using large screwdriver, push on inner edge so it slips into hole and releases
Look back to left (slightly); locate two 4mm nuts. Using 5/16" tool, remove both (one holds left leg of cowl to wood trim/frame-other holds instrument panel to frame).

Using the steno pad, diagram each electrical connection on the fuel gauge (far right), label each with the wire color code (look carefully for secondary color) listing predominant / secondary colors. For me, this is easier than trying to read a wiring diagram on my back. Disconnect wires and loosen "fat nut" (upper right-finger tight). With one loose, remove instrument, carefully moving wires.

Find the defrost vent hose; loosen the clamp and remove hose (only), gently, lest you damage the outlet that pokes up through the dash. Now that you can see into this area, find back of the clock, diagram and remove, maneuvering it through mass of wires. Locate the left pair of 4mm nuts and remove (you may have to come out and do this from front). Before you move, locate the next pop clip (in the same vicinity as 4mm nuts). This one is a bugger If you have the right screwdriver (I didn't ), you may be able to pop this one loose. Maybe super narrow, long needle nose pliers will work. Good idea to go ahead and diagram and remove the next instrument leaving the speedometer for last.

Now get out and have a beer before tackling two buggers:

First bugger (if the condenser / A/C blower are out it would be a breeze)... Tools needed: long, large blade screwdriver, needle nose vise grips (mine approx. 6"-7" long) and a #1 phillips head tip (1" long type that goes in slotted screwdriver). Locate the second #1 phillips roundhead screw. Remember this one holds down the other vertical leg of the instrument cowl. Clamp the phillips head tip in the needle nose vice grips and using the screwdriver blade as a wedge, push the tip up into the phillips screw. You will get about 1/16th of a turn. If you can find a #1 phillips 1" stubby screwdriver, buy it. (The very next week, I found one. It would have been much easier).

Stop, have another beer.

Next, using a 10mm wrench (size?), remove the bolt that holds a "U"-shaped clamp. Remove two others; one to the left of steering column, and one in glove box area.

If you have an automatic, us a #0 phillips to disassemble the shift indicator on dash. I unsoldered the connections. I did not mark them because I'm converting to a 5 speed. You should mark and record in your note pad if you will remain automatic. Note the plate for both this and the next item are not glued. After removing screws, use a hair dryer or heat gun (on low) to heat area, and they will come loose with gentle pressure.

Go ahead and remove the "fasten seatbelt" indicator. Label the electric connector using masking tape. Using a small slotted screwdriver, gently pry the wooden speaker grill loose and remove the speaker. With these two openings (clock & speaker) you can now feel that pop clip. To see it, use a small mirror and point a light source at it so you can see what you are doing (backwards). I used a small screwdriver with a long (4") shaft that I had previously bent. After a half hour, I managed to pop it loose. Now reach on the right side of the speaker opening and locate the third pop clip. Fairly easy. The last one is to your right (opposite of 1st one). It is also easy.
While you are there, remove the defrost vent hose (only) on this side. The cowl and top are one piece so they come off together. Before you attempt to lift it off, check both tip ends of the top plate. I found a 1" screw that came in through the door jam holding the tip to the "A" pillar. In addition, you have pressure/squeeze points in several places. Make note of each. The vertical legs of the cowl may stick to the Naugahyde™ surface. Heat with hairdryer and gently pry up with your finger. Then apply pressure to the entire top, trying to see if any of pop clips have re-clipped. Re-release them and apply pressure to top again. The objective is get a tip end up past the pillar moving it up and back (I should have used a cooking spatula to slip between the Naugahyde on the pillar and the tip. It would have prevented damage). But remember those 4mm studs on the cowl that fit through the wood? As you lift, just a little, these studs are trying to exit their slot shaped holes. The back edges of the cowl legs may stick to the wood too.

So you are trying to maneuver the tip ends, the studs and, OH YEAH, those defrost vents. Stop for a moment; make sure you got them moving around some from below. Don't bind. Break one and it will be the one NLA. Use the spatula under the left tip end and slide it up past the pillar (I did but not sure it was the best way), I wonder if I had pulled up and toward me that it would have worked better? I do not know! Are the pop clips free? Are the studs coming loose? Once they are and the whole top part is up about 1-1/2 inches, maneuver the defrost vents free from the special clips (underside) on both sides and push them down and away from the top part. If everything is free, stop, and gently push the electrical socket for the "fasten seatbelt" indicator down and through the hole until it is free. Now you can lift it gently away.
Have another beer. It's downhill, almost, from here.

You are now going to remove all the #1 phillips heads screws that hold the trim piece to the wood top edge. Once done, remove the round head Phillips screws that hold the trim to frame. Remove the trim pieces. Now you are going to start on the padded lip of the ledge. First remove the headlight switch knob by turning counter clockwise. Use circlip pliers (may have to adapt tips to fit in the slots) to turn and unscrew the face plate on the switch. Careful, do not scratch. Now with your fingertips pull the matte chrome strip away from one end of the lip. There are numerous pin/clips (about every 7" or 8") and once you get the first two loose (either side), measure the distance between them so, you can estimate where the next one is. There are none over the steering column. Disconnect the "hazard light" now. Several of these clips would not come loose with gentle pressure, so I used a long shaft, medium screwdriver and started at the console area where the trim tapers down and worked the screwdriver in to where the next pin should be. Then I turned the blade to wedge and pry (carefully). Not only did it come loose, it pulled the female part out of the lip. Slipped them back in with no problem. This took about 20 minutes. Then you can remove the lip by removing all the screws. By the way, you should be putting all these screws and stuff, with labels (what from what) in plastic zipper bags. I got a whole slew of them from a local jewelry store, because I wanted little bitty ones and you cannot buy them at Safeway.

The instrument panel is next. Use a little heat (careful, just a little or you will burn the thin material) if it sticks. Once loose, you can better see and diagram the backs of speedo; disconnect wires and cable and remove both.
Now using a screwdriver, loosen the bottom part (or shelf) a little at a time. Get the wood trim to move up and down some because it is a tight fit. The far left is the weak point, so do not stress (!!!) either side too much; you could crack that thin piece of plywood.

Once the bottom part is out, you will need a fine screwdriver to remove the screws that hold wood trim to the bottom. And an even finer one to clean the slots of the screw heads so you get enough bite and not strip the slot. My screws are pretty rusty and if I had not cleaned the slots, I would have certainly stripped one.

If you want to remove the little spear-like dividers that are affixed to the bottom part (I have not done this yet), I am told that they are glued to a "biscuit" and some heat on the reverse side should cause the glue to release. I am going to use a heat gun and do it this weekend. In fact, I did break one so be careful. Now, carefully maneuver the right defrost vent out.

Well, there you are. If I can do this, you can too! Be careful and try not to mess anything up.

GOOD LUCK!
 

Paul's Place

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The title situation has been resolved.

"Update on the title documents for the car. Alabama DOES NOT issue a title for cars more than 35 years old. A registration is issued. When a vehicle this old is sold a copy of the registration, and a bill of sale is all that is required to transfer ownership. Every state in the union recognizes the Alabama policy. Each state has a different way of dealing with a car that is disassembled. Some only require the above documents and do not need to physically see the vehicle (FL). Some will not issue a title until the vehicle can be inspected as a running driving car (NC & OH) If you purchase this car you will receive a registration document, the bill of sale from Alabama owner to the North Carolina owner, and bill of sale from the North Carolina owner to you. Check with your state to find out how they deal with titling disassembled vehicles prior to bidding. If you believe I am incorrect, please fact check me. If you are not comfortable with anything stated, then please do not bid."
 

Markos

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The title situation has been resolved.

"Update on the title documents for the car. Alabama DOES NOT issue a title for cars more than 35 years old. A registration is issued. When a vehicle this old is sold a copy of the registration, and a bill of sale is all that is required to transfer ownership. Every state in the union recognizes the Alabama policy. Each state has a different way of dealing with a car that is disassembled. Some only require the above documents and do not need to physically see the vehicle (FL). Some will not issue a title until the vehicle can be inspected as a running driving car (NC & OH) If you purchase this car you will receive a registration document, the bill of sale from Alabama owner to the North Carolina owner, and bill of sale from the North Carolina owner to you. Check with your state to find out how they deal with titling disassembled vehicles prior to bidding. If you believe I am incorrect, please fact check me. If you are not comfortable with anything stated, then please do not bid."
Thanks for the update. Each state is different, some are easy, some are pointlessly difficult. I titled my parts car in my name using a Bill of Sale with the seller and his Bill of Sale from when he purchased it. It was a bit of leg work but ultimately rather painless. I had the seller present at the licensing department which was helpful. If your secretary of state actually takes calls about this stuff it is an easy way to figure out how to proceed without scouring terrible state websites with conflicting information.
 

mulberryworks

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Wow, what a bunch of snarky comments on BAT. I'm glad this project has gotten a better reception here. Sure, not ideal to have it disassembled, but it wouldn't deter me if I was currently in the market for another E9.

Ian
 

Markos

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God I hate BAT. I may just have to finally register to reply to all of this diatribe.
 

Peter Coomaraswamy

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Is there a "buy now" price? I agree, looks like a nice starting place. Alternatively a project like this could be preserved for restoration at a later date which is making me think... :)
 

Markos

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Paul,

Perhaps you don't want to share, but it would be helpful if you let us know what the reserve price is. I understand the point of an ebay reserve, but I never use them. They offer a benefit over starting the auction at your low water mark. People will passionately bid above your reserve in the heat of the moment. Conversely people will shy away if you start your auction at your low water mark.

If you are asking for $30K you won't get it. I've seen two sales like that his in the last 12 months. One went to Alex in Canada (George Briggs) for about $5K. The othe is still for sale now and frankly won't sell anytime soon unless the forum member drops the $26K asking price significantly. These projects are very worthwhile to a select few. Personally, I am impressed both by the state of the body, but the level of parts organization.

You know how it works if you do this for a living, but this car still very conservatively needs $10K in materials (rubber/leather) and paint to get it on the road.
 

Paul's Place

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Thanks for all of your input and feedback guys. The car has been sold. I may be doing some of the work, but that has not been determined yet. If I do I will keep you posted on the progress. I am sure the new owner will be frequenting this forum.
 

pnlombardi

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Paul, or anybody interested in buying it, i have all 4 pieces of used window glass if you are interested. very reasonable price.
Hey Scott,

Nice to meet you via e9coupe!

I am the new owner of the project coupe you mentioned from ebay. Interesting story about the car and I'm so looking forward to getting started on it.
I am certainly interested in your glass so perhaps we can jump on a call sometime to discuss.

Down in West Palm Beach however the car will be put back together in Greensboro, NC.

Let me know the best way to get a hold of you.

Thank you in advance!

Peter Lombardi
 

Paul's Place

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I Just wanted to let all know that this car is available once again. The car is in the exact same condition as when it was for sale on Ebay, with the exception that side glass has been obtained, and title issue resolved. The car is located in Ohio and is available for viewing. I would like to see it go away before winter falls. If you are interested please PM me. Here is a link to some photos https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipNqIc8om2ytOU4RVjgD80zuGTYSyzeFGsW-G73iIgmFa4C1IbhhU5a3k7SEKhvKkg?key=a1pTUzJqbGxBTWRhQU5DSVZYTTBoQXhtN2xLSVJ3
 
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