So, how do you really feel about rising coupe values?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by dang, May 14, 2018.

  1. dang

    dang Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    I think most everyone will agree that the recent increase in coupe value is a positive thing, but I've actually had mixed emotions about it. Don't get me wrong, given a choice between prices going up or not I'd chose up, but at the same time it makes me feel differently about how I use the car, somewhat. I take care of the car the same, no water near it within 50 feet, can't drive it with a cloud in the sky 20 miles away, you know, the typical coupe owner thing, but I'm more conscience about it's value while I'm driving it. Similar thoughts about having Alpina wheels on the car, getting them stolen or damaging one or two and having to deal with finding them.

    Does anyone else think about this stuff or am I just wacko?
     
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  2. adawil2002

    adawil2002 Well-Known Member Site Donor $$

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    I used to be one of those owners who always worried about what would fail, break or just stop working while driving. Because that was the rhythm of our relationship. Drive, fix, drive, fix. When we drove Athena cross country in 2016 and everything was fine. I quit worrying and learned to love the car. Increased values have only reinforced how lucky I was to buy Athena in the first place in 2011.
     
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  3. teahead

    teahead aka "Rob" Site Donor

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    It's a good thing. Obviously if you're selling, but if not selling, if you pour $50k-$100k into your E9, then you won't feel so badly about it as you may be able to recoup some of your money.

    Of course, it's a bad thing if you're in the market for buying one now.
     
  4. Gransin

    Gransin Well-Known Member Site Donor

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    Worst thing about it is that part prices are rising accordingly.
     
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  5. lsquaredb

    lsquaredb Active Member

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    I don't mind rising parts prices so much if it means that parts that were unavailable for a long time will be remade. What I do mind is when the expensive parts don't fit or need a lot of rework. I'm especially annoyed with the repro rubber parts. The door seals which are $500 each are made of rubber that's too stiff and the doors stick out too far, are hard to close, and the front and rear side windows don't seal properly. The windshield gaskets which are the right section, but don't have the corners molded in, are hard to install neatly. The hood gasket has the same issues, but is even harder to get right. The problems aren't limited to rubber. The factory fenders didn't fit properly and needed a lot of rework.
     
  6. Philippe db

    Philippe db Active Member

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    Hi Dang,

    Well I for one don't think your a Wacko. If you have something special you should take care of it an treat it with respect. However you look at it these cars will still be around when we are all long gone. The only way to preserve them is to take extremely good care of them and to keep them in top condition. Only by doing this will they forever remain attractive to future generations of owners and live on until the end of times.
     
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  7. m_thompson

    m_thompson Active Member

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    I think that the asking prices for parts on eBay are a little frightening, and that my CS would be worth more if I sold it for parts than as a driving project.
     
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  8. oneills

    oneills Well-Known Member

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    I drive my coupe any dry day, spring, summer, fall, and when the salt has been washed off the roads in winter. A while back I would throw four track tires in plastic bags in the back seat and head out to driver's schools as far away from Bucks Count PA as Watkins Glen or VA. Sure, I have been caught in the rain. Once on the track. Now those were fun laps. (My Polaris Coupe looks stock but obviously it is not)

    But what concerns me most is the rising values that are putting our cars out of reach of someone like me 25 years ago. The younger enthusiast like me at that age who believed a coupe was the most beautiful car on the planet most likely can't afford to buy or buy and restore one unless they have all the skills necessary to do it themselves. And even then, parts will still make it difficult.

    In 1971 I bought my first and only New BMW, a 1600 for $3,000. I was two years into a long teaching career at Bucks County Community College, my wife was a school counselor. Could someone in my position now buy a new entry level BMW? Nope!! They will be in a Corolla or a Subaru. I bought my first coupe, a lovely Sahara 71 2800CS from a doctor's widow who refused to wear seat belts. It was 1984, we had two children, but she wanted to sell her car to someone who appreciated it. We used the same mechanic and he vouched for me. Price: $4,000.

    And right now as I read this board, an entry level coupe that needs a ton of work is $25,000 +. And it's not a daily driver that will reliably take me to work every day.

    I am rambling a bit, so I hope you get the gist of my point.

    Thanks for reading this far,

    Steve
     
  9. teahead

    teahead aka "Rob" Site Donor

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    Plenty of cheap E24s that a youngster can pour their money and sweat into
     
  10. oneills

    oneills Well-Known Member

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    What's an E24? Seriously. I stopped keeping track in the mid-seventies with the demise of the e9 and e3 and what ever they called the 2002.
    Anything after that, no thanks.
     
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  11. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    It’s the big coupe that came after e9’s. The buck stops with the e39 and e46 for me. Don’t ask me to identify any BMW that begins with an ‘F’.
     
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  12. dang

    dang Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    E36/8 will always be on my list.
     
  13. jamesw

    jamesw Active Member

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    This is a problem with every make of classic car right now. Everyone who grew up in the 70's and 80's and had a dream car now has the money to actually go out and buy one. Porsche, BMW, heck even VW's are insanely expensive now. My Datsun group is in the same hand-wringing phase right now too wondering why they all didn't buy a 240Z for $5,000 a few years ago and now it's $20K.

    It's just a sign of the times. I think this post could transition nicely to what is the "new" classic that people will be wanting? For me I really like the Z roadsters and the big 740's

    Cheers
    James
     
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  14. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    I guess I meant that I liked everything up to that point. An e36 M3 is the car to get right now before they are stupid expensive. Really though, I want an S52 M coupe.
     
  15. dang

    dang Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    That's what i was referring to. I'm not really an e36 fan, just the M Coupe.
     
  16. Wladek

    Wladek Well-Known Member

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    I think, all cool BMW's with bigger engines (old & young timers) much increased in price last year/s - look at current prices of M models E24, E30, E31, E34, E39, E46. Don't even want to talk about Alpina prices, that are just sick!
     
  17. Mal CSL 3.0

    Mal CSL 3.0 Active Member

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    I saw this comment from Jay L recently. I do wonder if it still holds true for people who have spent big money on classic cars in past couple of years.

    D5B4BF91-D9D2-45CE-B50E-D5AC6A6681AE.jpeg

    What I personally find hard to reconcile is that for the price of a good E9 you can now buy a close to new M2 or M3. For the price of a 1970’s 911S you can get a new high spec Carrera S. Etc etc.

    So I struggle to see how much more classic car prices can rise and go further beyond brand new model prices from the same manufactuers. These well priced new cars offer infinitely better driving experience, stunning performance, reliability and even killer looks. (Yes I know new cars depreciate but classic maintainence costs are also becoming very painful)
     
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  18. Drew20

    Drew20 Active Member

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    yes, and the car I really wanted was a Maclaren F1, missed my chance there I think!!
    ;)
    having bought into the E9 dream relatively recently, and having paid for that...... delay, I could reflect that I should have made my move earlier. Realistically, until recently I did not have a garage, so that was never going to work. I watched prices rise and rise and rise

    My reflection on current price trends is that I won't worry about the running costs, they are a small part of the picture, even if I need to pay "proper" prices for parts.

    One further thought is that I will not take short-cuts in my work on the car. Part of its value is tied to its condition and originality, so taking short-cuts makes no sense from a moral or an economic perspective. For example I spent hours repairing my washer bottle to original condition, rebuilding the pump, getting hold of original (used) hoses, clips and t-pieces, researching the routing of the hose through the engine bay, nose and bonnet. Would I have gone to the same lengths for an E24? probably not

    my other classic is an Alpina B12 (E38). The poor car was full of bodgery when I bought it, it really needed (and still needs) a lot of sorting out. Valuable classic or not, I strongly feel the moral duty to fix it all properly, but would I if it was "only" an 728i? This is taking some time and effort! (one of the rear window blinds was held on with silicon FFS!)
     
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  19. autokunst

    autokunst Well-Known Member Site Donor $$

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    For a coupe, I'l stick with the e9 (I'd include a 2002, and maybe the e24 in that list). My e36 is an M3/4/5 - M3, 4-door, 5-speed. The little sedan is where it's at. :D
     
  20. Nicad

    Nicad Well-Known Member

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    Loved my E36 M3/4/5. I could see buying a mint VR6 Corrado as a classic you could daily. At this point I will probably just settle into reliable nice driving newish cars I can use as an appliance. I loved my time behind the wheel of an M235I
     

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