Huge Issue (Frame Rust)

Discussion in 'E3 General Discussion' started by Haseeb, Mar 11, 2018.

  1. restart

    restart Well-Known Member

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    Some of you know I play Elmer the safety elephant on tv, haha.
    I am sure I will get flamed for saying this, and people,will say, oh I had a trailer hitch welded to my frame, blah, blah etc. ...but really...
    Yes, I know people weld frames. suggesting some one learns to weld on a frame is questionable. If you do weld your frame, I wouldn’t broadcast it. Check the dot regulations and ask your insurance provider and ask your welder if he will certify it.
    Dollars to donuts if push came to shove and someone is hurt or your car is totalled you could be in a difficult situation.
    People do it but people do plenty of things that are well...how do you say in english?
    Please prove me wrong. I have some welding projects. :)
     
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  2. bavbob

    bavbob Active Member

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    The top lip of these engine supports are usually solid since the water sits in the trough. Also there is easy access here as the supports are right out in the open. You go to Home Depot, you buy rebar and you practice until you get a nice through and through weld, beat the crap out of it with a BFH and it it holds, you are ready. I spent a month doing this because, like guitar playing, it will stick with you till you die and you are gonna use it over and over again.
     
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  3. duct-tape

    duct-tape Active Member

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    OH man, if you knew the "professional welders" I've met in the past. lol.

    but these posts make a great point, this is the perfect car to learn on. Their value isn't something scary if you do it wrong- this isn't a 1969 porsche, in general it's an easy car to work on with basic tools. and if there is something you're wanting to learn that requires a specialist (like welding) then you may be able to pay someone to teach you, on your own car. 2birds, 1stone.
     
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  4. autokunst

    autokunst Well-Known Member Site Donor $$

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    I should qualify that statement, because I take the art of welding nearly as seriously as those union guys you know. :) First, I do think it is an art, and a skill that requires a lot of practice. But we're not talking about root passes on pipe that will be x-ray tested for consistent and adequate penetration, or structural moment connections on critical overhead architectural components. We're talking about bonding two pieces of relatively thin metal that form a box section under a uni body car. Obviously the car in question still functions reasonably well with rusted out, structurally compromised sections - so it should be "relatively easy" to improve on that.

    But I do want to give a shout out to all the good welders out there. :D
     
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  5. dang

    dang Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    Given that you've made a point of saying you're not mechanical, but you show a lot of enthusiasm for the car, you might find out when the next Cars & Coffee gathering is near you and talk to some of the guys that show up in classics or street/rat rods. You might find someone that will show you how to repair it, or at least know of a shop that does that kind of work...
     
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  6. autowerks

    autowerks Active Member Site Donor

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    I agree with stephan,If you are willing to learn to weld well, it is all about the practice and there are a lot of videos on line!
     
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  7. Markos

    Markos Parts Hoarder Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    I've been watching this one from afar, but I'll update the recommendation that I made to Haseeb.

    Great lunch yesterday @Haseeb! Good to put a face to the new username. :)


    Firstly, I pretty much do everything myself (except natural gas plumbing) and I always advocate that people learn to work on their cars. I regularly "mentor" my good friend who bought a 70's Datsun. He knows very little about mechanics, but he is intelligent and motivated. With that said, I never lead him down a project that I don't think he can tackle.

    I don’t share Restart’s concern about the frame. It is thin sheet metal and the repair would be simple for a qualified welder. At the same time, this isn’t a DIY project for someone new to welding. Welding thin metal can be difficult. Welding upside down can be very difficult. It can also be tricky to find a "welding shop" that is willing to weld to a frame. Restoration shops are willing to do it but they are both expensive, and strapped for time for small one-off jobs.

    So back to the recommendation. The holes int he frame do not reach the edges of the frame. Measure the width of the frame from inside the curve, basically the flat underside of the frame but not the edges. Measure the length of frame that is suffering from rust damage. Get the gauge of metal from the forum (I'm not sure 16 or 18 perhaps?). Go to one of the many sheet metal shops in NJ with your measurements and have them cut the metal to size. Then go on CL under services and find a certified welder. There are a lot of professional welders that work for shops and utility companies that moonlight on the side. This is a good option for inexpensive quality work. Ask for pictures of some samples or perhaps some references. Ask about welding upside down.

    https://cnj.craigslist.org/search/bbb?query=welding+certified

    As far as doing things yourself, stick to my recommendation. Go to your local www.harborfreight.com. Pick up a set of aluminum jack stands, an aluminum racing jack, and a basic set of metric hand tools. Use these to change your calipers and rotors, etc - with the help of you mechanical friend. Read up on bleeding brakes the old fashion way (without a pressure bleeder). Bolt the new carbs back on yourself with the help of your friend. These are good DIY projects!
     
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  8. Haseeb

    Haseeb Active Member

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    That sounds like a really good idea! Haven't thought it before, thank you (-:
     
  9. Haseeb

    Haseeb Active Member

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    Markos is a cool guy y'all :)

    Wanted to make a quick post thanking everyone for their replies, seriously the community support here is fantastic;). Thanks for helping out the kid who had no idea what to do (me) with his wonderful old car. You guys are the best! I'll post updates as they come along
     
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