Fixing that little rust spot...

eriknetherlands

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Yes,b talking about the welding spots from there dir skin.
But there should be 2 spots?

Breiti
@Breiti : yes there were!
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Candia4441

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Over the past weeks I removed the internals from the right door, and pulled the skin off. The outer skin bottom part was spliced before by a PO, but it started rusting again. Also the underlying door structure had some rust spot on the top and bottom edge, so I patched in some 6 fresh pieces of steel.
While taking the skin off, i carefully marked where it was pinch welded, as I'd like to reproduce these welds again (though i do not know yet how too, as my spot welder will leave marks on the front of the door skin !) I slowly grinded the folded edge off until i saw the separate layers.

Dismanteling:
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Some structure to know which bolts need to go back where: a simple drawing with holes
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Doorskin with older patch panel; it had rust issues & needed being peeled off:
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some rusty bits underneath:
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wow you realy spend time to restore even the bolts and nuts is tagged, it look like it will be nice restoration, not like me all day looking for bolts and nuts I should of do it like you did and I have very bad memory
 

eriknetherlands

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Today I decided to see if I could make another part; the lead weight that is clamped to the inside of the door handle. I had one missing. Buying it somewhere and waiting for it takes too long...

Used some old roofing lead, a piece of angled aluminum, an old stainless pan and the wife away for an evening, I think I got the main shape right.

I did use a fresh air filer mask, lead is very harmful when inhaled.

First pic is the original part from the other door (with some felt backing).

I first purified the lead by melting it, and letting it drip down to the side; the debris and corroded film float (lead is heavy and pushes everything up), so that stays behind.

Then it is into the kitchen to heat it up and pour it in a mold.
The shape is actually pretty easy; a piece of 90 degree aluminum with to copper blocks to define the size. When set at the correct angle, it makes one beautiful ingot.

Now all it needs is some shaping to get the size right.
What I show you is attempt 4...Edit attempt 5; ingot#4 was too thick, and it would have taken too long to shave it to it correct thickness. Recasting #4 into #5 tok just ten minutes.
 

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eriknetherlands

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Recast attempt 4 into #5, and finished the part by shaving it with a sharp chisel (works wonderfuly well!) and drilling the two holes.

Last pic shows the original next to the new part.
Edit- added a pic after sanding it nicely flat on a belt sander.

I modified the original part with 4 small screws to reattach the lead weight after I rezinced the door handle mechanism. This should also prevent it from falling off ever again. In hind sight; 4 screws is a bit much, 2 would have been good enough
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