Deconstruction Thread: How to part-out an E9

Discussion in 'E9 Projects and Restorations' started by Markos, Feb 8, 2016.

  1. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    As much as I hate to part out an E9, I decided to harness the opportunity. I picked up a '73 CSI from WA this weekend.

    Original Listing:
    https://e9coupe.com/forum/threads/73-csi-in-wa-4-500.19855/

    The run down:

    The BMW 3.0 CSi VIN 2263445 was manufactured on October 05th, 1972 and delivered on October 09th, 1972 to the BMW dealer Wahl in Hüttental, Germany. The original colour was Polaris metallic, paint code 060.


    Purpose: This thread will document that part-out from a technical and financial standpoint. This is not a for sale-thead. All parts will be listed in the parts classifieds section. I encourage anyone to chime in with recommendations on the process, whether it is the disassembly process, or the pack/ship/sell process.

    Part-Out Goal (Success!): Get the parts I need. Sell the parts that I don't need, even if I want them. Break even. Once even, use remaining profit to pay down my excess spend on the project car. Help a bunch of people find that odd part. No hoarding! Part it all, including sheet metal!

    Hopefully this won't be the last time that I have two E9's in my driveway.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
  2. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    Total Spend (after registration): $3,400 (edit: adjusted up by $400 for the LSD)
    Total Sales: $0

    Assessment of the investment: I assume that some will say that I spent too much, and others might believe that the car should be saved. The front-end of the car is a wreck, and there are some compelling reasons why I don't think the car should be saved. Saving the car is certainly outside of my skill set, budget, and desire. Based on the build threads I've seen here, there are only a handful of members in the country that could pull off this restoration. Even if that was possible, there is no VIN (more below). In short - no regrets. From a financial standpoint, I'm fairly confident that I can recover the money spent on the car (with your help :D).

    Fenders:

    According to the PO, the person that he bought it from attempted to drive the car with the inner fenders cut. This sent the shock tower past the plane of the fender top. See pic for details. Also - this pic clearly illustrates the difference between a US and Euro blinker lense.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Wheel Well / Rocker:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The Deal Breaker
    In addition to the missing VIN plate, the number has also been cut from the firewall. The work is old, nothing that the PO did. Even if the car was restored, it would never be the same. The last remaining VIN (2263445) is on the WA import tag in the driver's door jam. I'll post a pic later, along with the engine block VIN.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018
  3. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    Thinking out loud. I've been running mental calculation on parts before putting an offer on the car.

    This car is kind of odd. It's a full euro model, with german wording on all instrumentation. No side markers, one blinker is euro, the other is a replacement US. It has full leather, which is uncommon on a euro car, but no headrests It has AC and a sunroof, but no passenger mirror.

    Edit: Updating availability status on the not-so-obvious stuff.


    Stuff to Keep:
    Dashboard
    Euro Cluster
    Seats
    Tail Lights
    Factory Jack
    Bumper Underriders
    Chrome Parts
    Badges
    Relays
    Trunk liner - rear seat back
    Parcel Sheld sheet metal
    Exhaust - pending inspection of mine and parts car
    Rear wheel arches
    Rear Fog setup and wiring
    Front Strut Tubes - Hopefully they are still true
    Springs
    Rear Disk Setup / Trailing Arms
    3.25 LSD
    Rear shock tower elephant skins
    Fuel hardlines
    Front/Rear windscreens

    Stuff to Sell:
    All AC components (NLA) - Sold
    Brass overflow tank (NLA) - Sold
    D-Jet everything (NLA) - Sold
    Block/Transmission - Sold
    Clutch Pedal Assembly & MT conversion parts - Sold
    Window regulators - Sold
    Chrome Stuff - belt line parts
    Rear fenders
    Roof
    Sunroof Header - Pending
    Rubber Filler boot (NLA) - Sold
    Fuel Tank & Pump - Pending interest
    Navy rear interior panels - Sold
    Doors - Half Sold
    Headlamps - Pending
    3x Steelies with dog dish hubcaps
    Rear Strut towers
    Late model Steering Wheel - Sold
    Chassis wiring harness - Pending
    Trunk Lid - Sold
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
  4. adawil2002

    adawil2002 Well-Known Member Site Donor $$

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    I know someone who needs the splined pieces the wiper arms attach to (picture below).

    I'd like the center grill if for sale.

    May be interested in the entire roof cut mid pillars to use as a sunroof transplant, this I need to discuss with a trusted professional. ;-)

    Advise keeping the front windscreen, my car has a replacement that is not as good as the original optically.
     

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  5. Gary Knox

    Gary Knox Well-Known Member

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    PM sent
     
  6. starcruiser

    starcruiser Member

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    Deconstruction

    Just document and label the parts, with fasteners and sundries. Have a space where they can be stored till they are used by you or sold. Good luck.

    Thank you for your earlier response.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2016
  7. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    Hey guys thanks for the PM's. You are welcome to PM me but you don't need to bump the thread. I really do want to document the process, and not turn this into a FS thread. Thanks!
     
  8. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    Any research you want to do, please share here! I think it would be good to talk to a body shop about shipping a roof skin. I can weld an X to the underside between the pillars. We could get fancy and have adjuster nuts on them. Body shops have foam bags that form fit when activated. Great for shipping.


    I agree about the factory glass. I will hold onto it for a bit. I bought Alan's old factory windscreen already, but I may break it on install.
     
  9. viphoto

    viphoto Member

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    Markos congratulations on your new purchase...your in it now! I look forward to following your thread...I am still in the process of deconstructing 1 of 2 1973 E'3's I bought about the same time as the Hawaii Coupe. Still haven't got to the point of selling much of it off though I think a big hurdle is trying to fairly price the stuff I don't need, at least you have the archives as to relevant coupe parts prices....not so much for E3's.

    One thing I have found valuable is saving every nut, bolt , speed nut, clip and every inch of wiring and connectors I can get to (I have gone to the junk jar of misc stuff several times while working on the coupe.)

    Good Luck
     
  10. mulberryworks

    mulberryworks Active Member Site Donor

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    Space, the final frontier

    I've parted out several cars ('60s VWs) and space management is critical. Buying a set of steel shelves would pay off down the road. I would bag and label everything. Beetles were easy, I could memorize each bolt and its uses. I wouldn't try that trick now with my E9. You could reinsert fasteners in the removed part if you want to sell them together rather than hunt them down later.

    Have an extinguisher on hand when cutting things. You never know when flames will erupt and spoil your fun. CO2 is better than powder.
    Use lots of penetrant and lots time before trying to break loose a fitting. Think days. WD40 is not the best choice.
    An impact driver can sometimes be enough to crack it loose. There are electric ones as well as pneumatic.
    As a last resort, heat can be used to break loose a nut or bolt. Heating a fastener till it glows with an Oxy/Acetylene torch will loosen it for sure, at the cost of ruining its temper. I have bent 1' breaker bars (with a 5' cheater pipe) trying to get large nuts off, and then heat did the trick and it came off normally.
    A propane torch might be enough, but it will take much longer and heat a much greater area.

    Ian
     
  11. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    Thanks for the great Tips Ian! I have a storage facility reserved but haven't pulled the tigger yet. I have all the torches, and PB Blaster is my friend. The extinguisher expired, but I live near a fire extinguisher store (where I bought it).
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2016
  12. Gary Knox

    Gary Knox Well-Known Member

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    Markos,

    In my dis-assembly of the two P 928's, I had the best result from Kroil products for penetrating oils. Their basic oil is good, and comes in squeeze to drip cans and in aeorosol cans. I had especially good results from their Penephite (p-oil with graphite) and Silikroil (p-oil with silicone)

    Great learning process, and a great assistance to the e9 restoration community.
     
  13. viphoto

    viphoto Member

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    FWIW Markos, I forgot to mention that on some of the bigger heavier items that Greyhound Freight works pretty well. The also let you send a tote. I got a tranny off ebay from Florida shipped to Oceanside in a tote alot quicker than UPS (and it changed buses at least 4 times).
     
  14. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    Shipping:

    I used Greyound with great success getting my windscreen from Alan. It didn't break, which is a plus. It is also close to my office.

    For any buyers that work for a decent sized organization (corporate, education, non-profit) check in with your shipping department. You typically get discounted shipping. I shipped a set of 15" wheels for $40 not too long ago. You can buy the label and mail or email it to me, assuming that I provide weight and dimensions. As a consultant, I don't always have access to my client's shipping discount.
     
  15. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    Replicate Before Sale:
    I have been talking with a fabricator. I am going to scan the AC Vents, The Can relay receptacles, and the headlamp thumbscrews.The center cap on the left below is 3D printed. It isn't perfect, but none of the parts I'm scanning are terribly complicacted.

    Edit: This is now happening here

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2017
  16. Adam T

    Adam T New Member

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    The owner of that 3.0Cs had also come over to my place to pick some parts off the Bavaria you were able to scrounge some interior parts from.

    He had big plans of cutting the front end off the Bavaria and grafting it to the E9. He was all set to come over and take care of it one weekend, and then disappeared. Never heard from him again.

    I'm glad you ended up with the car and can get some useful parts off of it, and distribute the ones you don't need.
     
  17. Adam T

    Adam T New Member

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    Which 3D printing did you use for this? Looks too good to be FDM. SLA maybe?

    And which type of plastic?
     
  18. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    You know I'm not sure. We just started discussing. I know that it is a hard white plastic used for prototyping. The printer doesn't leave the fine lines like you see on the UPS Store or Home Depot printers. I know nothing about the process but look forward to learning more. I do know that the caps were printed from an existing file. As another forum member and Inhave discussed, the hard part is turning a 3D scanned image into a CAD file. Jay Leno's garage makes it look easy.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Markos

    Markos Rust Staff Member Site Donor $$

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    Motor: Checked the VIN on the block tonight. It's 2263950. Doesn't match the car, but it is a CSI motor, 505 units off from the chassis. The head is an '81.
     
  20. Adam T

    Adam T New Member

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    *insert another advantage to being an engineer :razz:

    I've got CAD and access to a couple different 3D printers. But similar to you, I'm short on time.

    Let me know if you get serious about wanting to duplicate those parts.

    In my mind, the image scanning is the most difficult part. That equipment can be quite expensive, and sensitive.
     

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