Deconstruction Thread: How to part-out an E9

Markos

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Things don’t usually go this well for me. 60 seconds of heat while under tension from the puller.


Pitman arm: $100


Battery Tray: $187



Total Sales: $5,885
Play Money: $2,485
 
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Markos

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The time has come to start cutting.
4098F9A9-A77C-42E8-81F0-C27F919EEF48.jpeg




I removed the tail panel and began the exploratory surgery on the rear fenders. The floor is toast but I kept the tow hook.

Drilling the spot welds on the tail panel:
E6D6A6F8-1CE7-49FA-AB7A-493E46633D57.jpeg


The trunk floor was shot so I didn’t spend anymore time separating the floor from the tail panel. I just cut right through the floor:
0760C820-F936-4F01-B55F-2E8B7454501D.jpeg


Fiberglass was covering the trunk floor:
915E6EF5-8EFE-4CC3-9806-4B885936AB51.jpeg


Getting started on the fender spot welds:
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These guys are tricky:
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There is a full weld where the “b-pillar” meets the window base. There is enough room to get it with a cutoff wheel:
1FA87BAB-46A1-483E-939E-5525142A4CC0.jpeg


Hunting around for the fender seams. A flap disk
doesn’t help because the lead blends in perfectly with the steel:


I’m not using any previous write ups. I did look at some photos of fenderless e9’s. I was led astray by a recent thread where the fender was cut wrong. The seam is much higher than my hunting expedition above. I haven’t wrapped my brain around the two visible seams seen below:

E59A27B9-132E-4F69-B471-B91E65E8DCC9.jpeg


The seam is just to the left of spot in this video:

BB469A9C-9AAA-4687-86E8-411DF563C0DB.jpeg
 
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Markos

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Thank you @Sven for confirming which of the seams above is for the fender. I need to remove more lead to reveal the weld on the upper seam. Also, we confirmed that there are no spot welds on the little firewall that sits on top of the wheel arch. I looked for them with the flap disk but found nine.

He also reminded me how long ago it was that he stopped by to grab some parts. I think he restored his whole car in the time it has taken me to tear one apart. :D

Sven’s reference pics:
386A665C-7B10-4A12-992D-A8F1BF66F705.jpeg
B95280E2-1E59-44E6-ACDA-62EE9BBC7CE9.jpeg


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Markos

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I think that’s someone at the Karmann had just got promoted to spot welding. I’m counting and my fenders has way more spot welds than Sven’s car. Particularly the fender arches. It was next to impossible to see the spots on the arch. As a result, I bent the metal until a a spot weld was evident. The wheel arches look like swiss cheese unfortunately.

When all is said and done, I really hope that I don’t need remove the fenders on my target car. I know this is a parts car, but I can’t help but review my work. All things being equal, Sven is a plastic surgeon and I am Dr. Frankenstein.

Lessons learned:

1. Don’t use a flap disk to remove the paint. It is too aggressive and smears the metal, hiding seams and spot welds. An orbital scotch brite pad works well.

2. Use wax on your spot weld cutter (thanks @sfdon)

3. Don’t cut too deep on the c-pillar. Not really a lesson, I knew I was cutting too deep. Perhaps helpful for the next guy.

4. Buy better spot weld cutters

5. Keep more composite dremmel disks on hand. There are small areas like the drip rail and the fender arch that benefit from a small cutting disk.

A944B775-BA24-4180-A031-1BC91809B1AD.jpeg
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Markos

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I need to find a BMW buddy next time. Today I pulled the roof, chopped the e9 in half, and loaded it onto a rather small trailer (5x9). It was all quite heavy, but rolling my project car around in the garage was harder. :D

In addition to the parts below, I have the rear fender, front fender arches. The rear tow hook. The rear tire hold down. The parking brake handle sheetmetal.

I decided that the tail panel wasn’t worth keeping. I cut out the fog area to be used as a template. I’m cleaning it up and mailing it to Texas this week.
6C9B89F4-1EBD-4142-83B2-BB5B1C2DC10E.jpeg


The roof needs to find a home ASAP. If no takers I will keep the pillars,
4BECA3F3-C4F5-454E-ADB2-4F5EF906FDC8.jpeg


These things are so beefy that I pity the person or ship that restores the entire unit. I cut it out for measurement purposes only. We are going to see what options exist for replacement tops.

Also in this pic you can see that I cut out the factory d-jet fuel pump mount. One of many parts of the body that are specific to the CSI/CSL.
BA1BDF34-7E21-445F-8B32-DC2819B1C40D.jpeg


I’m keeping the parcel shelf and the lower windshield frame. I also kept the front lower windshield frame.
70D2D3FE-FE7F-4A36-8CCF-BBAE6E8ACFEA.jpeg


The car was too big and too heavy for me to move into the trailer. I figure it still weighed about 600lbs (edit: Actual was 480lbs).I cut it in half in a spot that made sense weight wise. I realized that I forgot to cut out the windshield frame after cutting the car in half. It is easier to use a reciprocating saw when the car is sturdy. Oh well.
16B9E4E6-1C29-443F-82A1-FB9FF5277238.jpeg


A view if the rocker we don’t always see. Not supposed to be open on the bottom.
DCD5832B-B47A-455F-9AD0-3768E984D2AD.jpeg


Powered sheetmetal shears zip through the fender like butter. The goal was to save the arch, but Inkept some fender also.
DC82F8D1-BB50-4C4C-B118-FBFE917F5ECC.jpeg


A little rust on the floor:
D85025A5-2659-497A-AADB-ECB304FDF99B.jpeg


Ready to be crushed:
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A fitting end:
F83DEBEB-5DA5-4ED0-9C80-4F79E4B473A1.jpeg


The hardest part, wheeling my in-op project car back into place, doing a 180 around the post. It has always started fine but two months ago it just wouldn’t fire. I’ll tinker later. I don’t like that it doesn’t start, it is inconvenient even though I rarely drive it. Yes the wheels are ugly. They will be gone soon.
DD9CDE58-8B9F-4A0A-8B71-4635B7E625CD.jpeg


Roof : $500
07116A9E-92C8-4D4F-A73F-C2EA5A9E725D.jpeg


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Total Sales: $6,385
Play Money: $2,985
 
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Markos

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Warning: Wall of Text

This thread has run its course. My thought was that I would land at $7K in sales. I will edit below when I sell the roof (or sunroof) and fenders but otherwise it is effectively dead.

Initial Price: $3,000
LSD Addition: $400
Total Sales: $6,385
Play Money: $2,985

Now I will merge the finances with my project thread. The “Play Money” is to be deducted from
the project car spend. I’ll inventory the major
parts that I kept. The technical term is a crap ton of parts. Since we have been counting beans, I would say that I conservatively kept a “loose parts” value of about $6K. That helps to understand what a salvage CSI is currently worth.

I counted beans because when I first joined there was a lot of sentiment about cars in poor shape only being worth about $1,000-$2,000. I would argue otherwise and although it took me 2 years to establish my point, the sales data helps to baseline the value of a junker. A lot of precedence has been set on this site, but transparency of spend is not one of them. Kudos to other folks like @scottevest for sharing the very important financial aspect of a restoration. IMO, knowing what parts sell for and what it costs to fix these cars is critical for new and prospective owners.

This car was extra rotten and the VIN was hacked off (but not the import tag). I hope that no other CSI’s suffer this fate. This endeavor was never about making money. It really was about getting hard to find bits for my car. The greatest value for me was learning about the vehicle, and how it comes apart. I’ll obviously need to take apart another before I put one together. Hopefully by then I will have retained and documented enough to get it all assembled again.

Thanks to everyone who bought a part or two (or 20)!
 
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mark99

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the center of the wheels look red, are those the wheels that were on the car when you got it and were they red?
 

Markos

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the center of the wheels look red, are those the wheels that were on the car when you got it and were they red?
The centers are Chiarettorot. I bought them that way. They are temporary wheels that have good tires on them. I'm either going to trade them for 16" BBS RS or 7x14 FPS fauxpinas.
 
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