The Raven e9 project

autokunst

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I spent some time dressing the tips on the spot welder. These are listed as consumables on a device like this, and I wonder if I need to get a new pair. But I did get the current tips shaved down (like a big copper pencil) and then flattened the tips parallel and to a dimension of 5/32" per the specs (4mm). Then I did a series of test welds on some cleaned up 22 gauge material.

The tips are sticking to the material every time, and I am getting weld splash. In two instnaces it burned right through and bonded the tips of the welder together. I believe this is all because I am concentrating too much heat/current. I don't know if it will get better with thicker material (the car will be minimum 20 gauge material). Or if I need to dial this machine's output down in some manner. If anyone has experience with these types of resistance welders, I'd love to learn from your experience.
20210221-test patch.jpg
 

Ohmess

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I've used one of those back in the 13th century when I lived in Milwaukee. It was mounted in a floor stand and you used your foot to operate it, freeing up both hands to hold the work.

I would contact the manufacturer and see if they can help; perhaps they offered a more upscale version of that unit with some form of variable resistance alternative. Forms from that era might be a switch with high/low positions or a dial type rheostat.
 

m_thompson

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I bought a new one from Grainger in 1982 to reassemble my CS. The existing tips would not fit into many places that I needed to weld. I bought some extra tips and ground them with an offset center so I could make spot welds on the tops of the fenders, and in other tight places.
 

autokunst

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I bought a new one from Grainger in 1982 to reassemble my CS. The existing tips would not fit into many places that I needed to weld. I bought some extra tips and ground them with an offset center so I could make spot welds on the tops of the fenders, and in other tight places.
The same 2.5KVA power rating?
 

autokunst

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Yep. Have been to that thread and learned a bit about my machine from it. I am still concerned that the Model 33 unit I have has too much horsepower for the sheet metal. I found a chart that describes the proper time duration for the panels. It comes out to 8 cycles per weld. I don't think the 63 year old vacuum tube timer and pretty worn relay contacts that I tried to burnish, but..., has enough precision to repeat the 130 millisecond on time reliably. We'll see.

Worst case, I sell the unit I just refurbished and source a more tame version. But I have some new tips coming, and I'll try it out with some more correct sheet metal first.
 

autokunst

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Walloth Nesch
I know some have stated that they've had trouble with W&N orders - either problems with delivery time or problems with the cost. I just wanted to report that I have not experienced that personally. I ordered some more sheet metal six days ago and it just arrived today. I'd used a 20 EUR discount coupon, so if you apply that to the shipping, I feel these parts made it from Germany to my door step delightfully swiftly. Thumbs up!
 

nosmonkey

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Might be worth trying some shorter copper arms. With my 50cm arms on my spot welder there is a noticeable drop in quality in welds and its easier to punch through. On the thinner stuff I've noticed it really doesn't have to stay on for long to get a solid spot weld
 
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